Giro d’Italia 2014 Preview

May 09, 2014
Giro d’Italia 2014 Preview

Giro d’Italia

Viva l’Italia! When it comes to the Giro d’Italia time, Italy is swept up in a sea of cycling passion and pride as this iconic race is celebrated around the country. Indeed, the fever continues to gather momentum around the globe, with the UCI World Tour event regarded as one of the great three-week long Grand Tours on the annual racing circuit (along with the Tour de France and Spain’s Vuelta a Espana).

And who doesn’t love a bit of Italian flair and drama in life? Bring on this year’s Giro and another fight for pink!

The 2014 Giro d'Italia Route

Just like the Tour de France and the Vuelta a Espana, the Giro d’Italia route changes each year. One thing’s for sure, it never fails to journey through some of the most incredible sights Italy can offer. So what’s on the menu in 2014?


21stagesGiro2014


2014 Giro d'Italia Stage Break Down

Stage 1

Friday, 9th May 2014
Belfast – Belfast
21.7km

Stage 2

Saturday, 10th May 2014
Belfast – Belfast
218km

Stage 3

Sunday, 11th May 2014
Armagh – Dublin
187km

Rest Day

Monday, 12th May 2014
Rest

Stage 4

Tuesday, 13th May 2014
Giovinazzo – Bari
121km

Stage 5

Wednesday, 14th May 2014
Taranto – Viggiano
200km

Stage 6

Thursday, 15th May 2014
Sassano – Montecassino
247km

Stage 7

Friday, 16th May 2014
Frosinone – Foligno
214km

Stage 8

Saturday, 17th May 2014
Foligno – Montecopiolo, Italy
174km

Stage 9

Sunday, 18th May 2014
Lugo – Sestola, Italy
174km

Rest Day

Monday, 19th May 2014
Rest

Stage 10

Tuesday, 20th May 2014
Modena – Salsomaggiore, Italy
184km

Stage 11

Wednesday, 21st May 2014
Corregio – Savona, Italy
249km

Stage 12

Thursday, 22nd May 2014
Barbaresco – Barolo, Italy
46.4km

Stage 13

Friday, 23rd May 2014
Fossano – Rivarolo Canavase, Italy
158km

Stage 14

Saturday, 24th May 2014
Aglie – Oropa, Italy
162km

Stage 15

Sunday, 25th May 2014
Valdengo – Montecampione, Italy
217km

Rest Day

Monday, 26th May 2014
Rest

Stage 16

Tuesday, 27th May 2014
Ponte di Legno – Val Martello, Italy
139km

Stage 17

Wednesday, 28th May 2014
Sarnonico – Vittoria Veneto, Italy
204km

Stage 18

Thursday, 29th May 2014
Belluno – Rifugo Panarotta, Italy
171km

Stage 19

Friday, 30th May 2014
Bassano del Grappa – Monte Grappa, Italy
26.8km

Stage 20

Saturday, 31st May 2014
Maniago – Monte Zoncolan, Italy
167km

Stage 21

Sunday, 1st June 2014
Gemona – Trieste, Italy
169km


Teams Invited to the 2014 Giro d’Italia

Watching a world-class peloton move at incredible speeds, you can be forgiven for having a hard time keeping up with the pace, even if that just means watching it all from the couch!

Get familiar with this year’s teams by knowing who’s wearing what jersey. With exception to the riders who win the right and privilege to wear a special Giro d’Italia jersey (see below), these are the team kits you can expect to see working hard, hard, hard!

team jerseys 2014


This year’s Giro d’Italia provisional start list is as follows:

AG2R La Mondiale (ALM), FRA - Domenico Pozzovivo - Davide Appollonio - Julien Berard - Maxime Bouet - Axel Domont - Hubert Dupont - Patrick Gretsch - Matteo Montaguti - Alexis Vuillermoz

Astana Pro Team (AST), KAZ

  • Michele Scarponi
  • Valerio Agnoli
  • Fabio Aru
  • Janez Brakjovic
  • Enrico Gasparotto
  • Borut Bozic
  • Mikel Landa Meana
  • Paolo Tiralongo
  • Andrey Zeits

Belkin Pro Cycling Team (BEL), NED

  • Wilco Kelderman
  • Jetse Bol
  • Rick Flens
  • Marc Goos
  • Martijn Keizer
  • Steven Kruijswijk
  • David Tanner
  • Maarten Tjallingii
  • Jos Van Emden

BMC Racing Team (BMC), USA

  • Cadel Evans
  • Brent Bookwalter
  • Yannick Eijssen
  • Ben Hermans
  • Steve Morabito
  • Daniel Oss
  • Manuel Quinziato
  • Samuel Sanchez Gonzalez
  • Danilo Wyss

Cannondale (CAN), ITA

  • Ivan Basso
  • Oscar Gatto
  • Michel Koch
  • Paolo Longo Borghini
  • Alan Marangoni
  • Moreno Moser
  • Daniele Ratto
  • Davide Villella
  • Elia Viviani

FDJ.FR (FDJ), FRA

  • Nacer Bouhanni
  • Sebastien Chavanel
  • Arnaud Courteille
  • Murilo Antonio Fischer
  • Alexandre Geniez
  • Johan Le Bon
  • Francis Mourey
  • Laurent Pichon
  • Jussi Veikkanen

Garmin Sharp (GRS), USA

  • Ryder Hesjedal
  • Andre Fernando S Martins Cardoso
  • Thomas Dekker
  • Tyler Farrar
  • Koldo Fernandez
  • Nathan Haas
  • Daniel Martin
  • Dylan Van Baarle
  • Fabian Wegmann

Lampre-Merida (LAM), ITA

  • Damiano Cunego
  • Winner Anacona Gomez
  • Matteo Bono
  • Mattia Cattaneo
  • Roberto Ferrari
  • Manuele Mori
  • Przemyslaw Niemiec
  • Jan Polanc
  • Diego Ulissi

Lotto Belisol (LTB), BEL

  • Sander Armee
  • Lars Ytting Bak
  • Kenny De Haes
  • Gert Dockx
  • Adam Hansen
  • Mixime Monfort
  • Tosh Van Der Sande
  • Tim Wellens
  • Dennis Vanendert

Movistar Team (MOV), ESP

  • Nairo Alexander Quintana Rojas
  • Andrey Amador Bakkazakova
  • Igor Anton Hernandez
  • Eros Capecchi
  • Jonathon Castroviejo Nicolas
  • Jose Herrada
  • Franciso Ventoso
  • Gorka Izaguirre Insausti
  • Adriano Malori

Neri Sottoli (NRI), ITA

  • Matteo Rabottini
  • Giorgio Cecchinel
  • Ramon Carretero
  • Francesco Chicchi
  • Daniele Colli
  • Andrea Fedi
  • Mauro Finetto
  • Yonattah Monsalve
  • Simone Ponzi

Omega Pharma – Quick-Step Cycling Team (OPQ), BEL

  • Rigoberto Uran Uran
  • Gianluca Brambilla
  • Thomas De Gendt
  • Iljo Keisse
  • Serge Pauwels
  • Alessandro Petacchi
  • Wouter Poels
  • Pieter Serry
  • Julien Vermote

Orica-GreenEDGE (OGE), AUS

  • Brett Lancaster
  • Cameron Meyer
  • Ivan Santaromita
  • Luke Durbridge
  • Michael Hepburn
  • Michael Matthews
  • Mitch Docker
  • Pieter Weening
  • Svein Tuft

Team Europcar (EUC), FRA

  • Pierre Rolland
  • Yukiya Arashiro
  • Angelo Tulik
  • Tony Hurel
  • Davide Malacarne
  • Maxime Mederel
  • Perrig Quemeneur
  • Romain Sicard
  • Bjorn Thurau

Team Giant – Shimano (GIA), NED

  • Marcel Kittel
  • Bert de Backer
  • Simon Geschke
  • Tobias Ludvigsson
  • Luka Mezgec
  • Georg Preidler
  • Tom Stamsnijder
  • Albert Timmer
  • Tom Veelers

Team Katusha (KAT), RUS

  • Joaquin Rodriguez Oliver
  • Maxim Belkov
  • Giampaolo Caruso
  • Vladimir Gusev
  • Alberto Losada Alguacil
  • Daniel Moreno Fernandez
  • Luca Paolini
  • Angel Vicioso Arcos
  • Eduard Vorganov

Team Sky (SKY), GBR

  • Dario Cataldo
  • Edvald Boasson Hagen
  • Philip Deignan
  • Bernhard Eisel
  • Sebastian Henao
  • Chris Sutton
  • Salvatore Puccio
  • Kanstantsin Siutsou
  • Ben Swift

Tinkoff Saxo (TCS), RUS

  • Nicolas Roche
  • Christopher Juul Jensen
  • Rafal Majka
  • Evgeny Petrov
  • Pawel Poljanski
  • Ivan Rovny
  • Chris Anker Sörensen
  • Michael Rogers
  • Jay Mccarthy

Trek Factory Racing (TFR), USA

  • Robert Kiserlovski
  • Eugenio Alafaci
  • Julian David Arredondo Moreno
  • Fabio Felline
  • Danilo Hondo
  • Giacomo Nizzolo
  • Boy Van Poppel
  • Fumiyaki Beppu
  • Riccardo Zoidl

Wild Cards

Each year ‘wildcard’ teams are invited to participate in the Giro d’Italia. The teams invited to the 2014 event are:

Androni Giocattoli , AND (ITA)

  • Franco Pellizotti
  • Manuel Belletti
  • Marco Frapporti
  • Yonder Godoy
  • Johnny Hoogerland
  • Marco Bandiera
  • Jackson Rodriguez
  • Diego Rosa
  • Emanuele Sella

Bardiani-CSF, BAR (ITA)

  • Stefano Pirazzi
  • Enrico Battaglin
  • Nicola Boem
  • Francesco Manuel Bongiorno
  • Marco Canola
  • Sonny Colbrelli
  • Enrico Barbin
  • Nicola Ruffoni
  • Edoardo Zardini

Colombia

  • Fabio Andres Duarte Arevalo
  • Rodolfo Andres Torres
  • Edwin Alcibiades Avila Vanegas
  • Robinson Eduardo Chalapud Gomez
  • Leonardo Fabio Duque
  • Jarlinson Pantano
  • Carlos Julian Quintero
  • Jeffry Johan Romero Corredor
  • Miguel Angel Rubiano Chavez

Some Giro d’Italia History…


There’s nothing like a healthy bit of inter-continental competition…

In 1908 Italy’s Gazetta dello Sport newspaper announced the first ‘Giro d’Italia’, an event to take place the following year and to rival its neighbour’s Tour de France.

Like the Tour, the Giro usually features a stage in another country, before journeying extensively through its home country, showcasing some of the most spectacular scenery and challenging terrain that Italy can deliver.

The Giro has been responsible for creating legendary names in Italian cycling including Fausto Coppi, Fiorenzo Magni and Gino Bartali and indeed, it was not until 1950 that the Italian stronghold was broken, with Swiss Hugo Koblet becoming the first foreigner to win the great race.

Coppi, Alfredo Binda and Eddy Merckx remain Giro d’Italia demigods, having each taken the leader board five times during their cycling careers.

Snapshots from The Giro d’Italia Historic Leader Board:

So what have been some of the stand-out wins and milestones during the course of the Giro d’Italia?

1909 – Luigi Ganna, Italy takes out the very first Giro d’Italia
1915-1918 – The Giro is suspended during World War I
1940 – Fuasto Coppi wins at 20, the youngest ever
1941-1945 – The Giro is suspended during World War II
1950 – Hugo Koblet, Switzerland (first non-Italian to win)
1960 – From this date on the place of departure for the Giro has changed each year
1987 – Stephen Roche wins and becomes the first native English speaker to do so
2010 – Ivan Basso, Italy
2011 – Michele Scarponi, Italy (originally won by Alberto Contodor who was stripped of the title)
2012 – Ryder Hesjedal, Canada
2013 – Vincenzo Nibali, Italy
2014 – The Giro’s ‘grande partenza’, or ‘big start’ commences in Belfast, Ireland and the Irish have been encouraged to wear pink in celebration

Irish have been encouraged to wear pink in celebration

Ireland giro2014


The Giro d’Italia Jersey Code

What’s with all this jersey talk and what on earth does it mean? Here we clarify who wears what and why. But let’s start with an Italian lesson – “maglia” is something you’ll probably hear a fair bit of during race coverage. It is Italian for jersey.

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Giro d’Italia Pink Jersey

Or ‘maglia rosa’ as it is known in Italian, is inspired by the colour of Giro d’Italia founding sponsor Gazzetta dello Sport and is worn by the rider at the top of the leader board (therefore the rider with the lowest aggregated time). In short - pink is the colour of the Giro d’Italia! ‘Fight for pink’ is a slogan commonly associated with this event; riders fight hard on the bike to win the most coveted colour on this grand tour.

Giro d’Italia Blue Jersey

Or ‘maglia azzurra’ goes to the fastest climber in the race. This jersey was green until last year. There are 39 categorised climbs in the Giro d’Italia ranging from first category (hardest) to fourth category. The famous ‘Cima Coppi’ or king of the mountain goes to the first rider to reach the highest pass.

Giro d’Italia Red Jersey

Or ‘maglia rosso’ is much like the Tour de France’s green jersey, and is worn by the Giro d’Italia rider to accumulate the most number of points during intermediate sprint and stage finishes.

Giro d’Italia White Jersey

Or ‘maglia bianca’ goes to the young up and comer – the Giro d’Italia rider under the age of 26 with the lowest aggregate time on general classification.


Giro d’Italia Types of Stages

Is the Giro d’Italia all about mountain climbs? Is it all about super speedy sprints to the finishing line? Or is it all about Individual or Group Time Trials? Well it’s a combination of all these, and each is referred to as a ‘stage’.

Mass Start Stages

This is the predominant way of starting a Giro d’Italia stage, and requires the full peloton (or full number of riders) to begin as a group.

Mountain Stages

This is where some of the biggest upsets can occur in terms of changes to the leader board. Mountain stages play to the strengths of riders who are specifically strong mountain climbers. Riders can be eliminated during mountain stages if they fail to finish within the allocated time.

Individual Time Trial Stages A time trial is essentially a race against time – to cover as much distance as possible within a set time. Start times are staggered at three-minute intervals and cyclists must commence this stage alone.

Team Time Trial Stages

Similar to the individual time trial stage, but applies to team starts versus individual starts. Team Time Trials enable team members to work strategically and to play to each other’s strengths/ minimise each other’s weaknesses.

So there you have it – the who/what/where/when of this year’s Giro d’Italia. Let the Fight for Pink begin!