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How To Choose Bike Size

The most common method used to measure a bike is from the centre of the crank axle to the top of the seat tube. In choosing a bike size, you may find that your measurements for bike size will differ between off-road and on-road bikes (e.g. a 46cm road bike is the same overall size as a 33cm mountain bike). In addition, off-road bikes will usually need to provide the rider with more freedom of movement, resulting in a longer seat pole and a reduced seat tube. Also, an off-road rider will spend less time on the seat than an on-road cyclist. When learning how to choose a bike size, it is important that you refer to the correct sizing charts for your particular style of bike after getting your measurements. Typically, bikes for different terrains will be the same overall height when positioned next to each other.

If you’re choosing a bike for a child, the measurements are different from an adult bike. Almost all bikes for children are measured according to the size of the wheels. When buying a bike for a child, you can use their age as a rough guide and then their height to find the most suitable match. If your child is in their early teens (over 13 years old), they may be able to use a junior adult bike. Buying a bike for a growing child or young adult poses some challenges. However, it is essential to buy a bike that fits your child correctly. While it can be tempting to buy a slightly bigger bike, it can be challenging for them to ride properly, and this may result in accidents.

Why is it important to choose the right bike size?

Most people learn to ride a bike when young. At that point in your life, you probably rode bikes of all shapes and sizes, and it didn’t seem to matter too much. Your bike was possibly handed down from an older sibling (or purchased from the neighbourhood kids), and it was probably ridden until your knees were hitting the handlebars. However, as an older rider, it’s more important to learn how to choose a bike size and make sure you can ride it safely and comfortably. Whether we like to admit it or not, adult joints are more prone to wear and injury than our younger selves.

Understanding how to choose a bike size is one thing, but it might not seem that important unless you understand why. Is it that much of a concern if the bike is a little smaller than required? Well, in the short term, it may not be that big of a problem. But when you use the bike often, you’ll quickly come to understand some of the issues. The main reason you’ll need to choose the right size bike for your stature is simply comfort. The more comfortable your ride, the longer you’ll be able to use the bike. If you’re looking at the bike to be a part of your daily commute, it is much better to arrive at work relaxed rather than all cramped up.

It can be frustrating to find a bike that you think is brilliant, only to find out that it is not available in your size. While buying a smaller bike can be tempting, the issues it can cause your body make it entirely not worth it. To start, the way you are positioned on the bike can affect the amount of power you can derive from the bike. In addition, using a bike that is not the right size for extended periods can cause back pain, excessive fatigue, and wrist pain. You will also not have the same level of control over the bike, which could potentially increase accident rates.

How to choose the right bike size?

When you’re looking for a new bike, knowing how to choose a bike size will mean getting a good fit. Before you purchase any bike, it would be best to get your exact measurements first. You can start by measuring your height and inseam. Getting the inseam measurement is easier with the help of a friend. To measure your inseam properly, you’ll need to remove your shoes and stand with your feet slightly apart. Next, make a mark on the floor between your feet and measure from that spot to your groin. After you have these measurements, you’ll have a good idea of the size of bike that will fit you the best. However, not all bikes are created equal. For example, if you fit one particular size for a road bike, you may need a different size for a mountain bike. This difference lies in how those bikes are made and measured. Road bikes (commuter bikes, racing bikes, etc.) are often sold using metric measurements. Mountain bikes, gravel bikes, and other off-road bikes usually use imperial measurements (inches, etc.). If you only have one set of measurements available, you can use online calculators to convert these numbers.

Understanding how to choose a bike size and finding a bike that is the correct size for our body is the first step in bike selection. People are all different, and you may find some extra adjustments can be made to make the bike perfect for your needs. One of the most crucial steps is ensuring that you have the correct bike frame size. All other adjustments to the bike can be made later as you gain experience and figure out what other elements will best suit your riding style. If you’re only getting into cycling, you can choose from the best cheap road bikes or beginner bikes. After using those, you’ll be better equipped to work out what makes the bike perfect for your size and riding style.

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